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The Team

 

Agnes

Agnes M. Fallah-Kamara Umunna

Agnes M. Fallah Kamara-Umunna, CEO Radio Producer/Presenter 

Agnes is a Journalist, Radio Producer/Presenter and Community Activist.

She helps to record stories from survivors of the war in Liberia and see how best we can talk about the trauma they have gone through during the 14 years of war. As Executive Director and founder of Straight from the Heart Project, she used the project to engage victims, witnesses and perpetrators of the Liberian conflicts, and established it as a Non-Governmental and Not-For-Profit Media network that engages in nationwide advocacy program on radio, for War Victims to voluntarily give accounts of their participation in the Liberian conflict. With her extensive engagements she thought it wise to also established counseling for Peace Building, Psycho-social and trauma healing and other aspect of integration, reconciliation, and transitional and restorative justice mechanisms.

Agnes has entirely devoted reconciliation and herself to promote healing, advocacy against war crimes, abuses and atrocities committed against humanity and their Societies during and after conflicts in Liberia. Her project Straight From The Heart is helping both victims and perpetrators of the Liberian crisis pick up the pieces and look with hopes for a better future.

Her engagements, interactions and mingling with the victims, witnesses and perpetrators, realizing their physical and emotional needs and catering to them, have given her the greatest epitome in gaining their confidences and reliance. This transitional mechanism is working well in a magnificent manner enhancing the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Liberia (TRC) and other associated organizations. This venture needs to be adopted by other countries going through similar situation that Liberia was faced with.

Agnes is very active in a variety of civic and cultural organizations that deals with victims, witnesses and perpetrators of the war in Liberia. Outside of professional interests, she likes to travel widely, read, watch documentary films and enjoys living and talking to young, needy families after the war in Liberia.

 

FaciaFacia Boyenoh Harris- Broadcast Journalist and Human Rights Advocate

Facia Boyenoh Harris is a practicing Journalist based in Liberia with interest in women and girls issues.  She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and a diploma in Psycho social Counseling.

Her passion for women and girls empowerment coupled with inspirational and professional mentoring from Mr. Joseph Roberts-Mensah head of the UN Radio in Liberia. She has worked extensively with women and girls, advocating for their rights through the production of radio programs. She‘s working at the community level by empowering young Liberian through educational and health programs.

She provides support for disadvantage girls who suffered all forms of abuses including rape, torture, physical and emotional abuse and other forms of sexual violence through counselling initiatives and working with Straight From the Heart.

These duties combine with her special interest in gender advocacy especially for girls and women empowerment with focus on creating awareness on violence against women.  Gender-based violence as a human rights concern and public health issues and protection for young women and girls who suffer abuse are the source of her desire to forge ahead.

Facia uses her leisure time volunteering with youth groups and youth related organizations primarily talking with girls and young women about international instruments that help protect their rights and empower them, i.e. sexual and gender based violence, Resolution 1325, Millennium Development Goals etc.

She works in helping to create a safe space for young Liberia women and adolescent girls in post war Liberia.

Yeenea P. Daniels, vice president of Zoduwah Foundation

heahshotsouthfingrillpic2Yeenea P. Daniels is a co-founder and vice president of Zoduwah foundation. She is currently the VP at Zoduwah Production, where she overseas productions projects and administrative duties. Prior to working for Zoduwah Productions, Miss Daniels worked at Thieme Medical Publisher as the Sales Coordinator for 3 years. She generated leads for products adoption opportunities, supported international sales team and worked as the sales report specialist. She also volunteered with Project Hospitality, Staten Island, NY where she worked with the recreation coordinator. She also volunteers at the Staten Island Liberian Community Association food pantry.

She graduated from St. John’s University with a BA in Communications.

Neima N. Amara, Nurse and Educator

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A female Liberian Registered Nurse by profession and a married with one daughter.  Counseled some of the victims of the war before and after they gave their stories to be aired at Straight From The Heart radio program in 2004/2005. At that time, she was still a nursing student but was highly interested in helping people (women) who were victimized trough the war and suffered from STI’s and other health conditions and felt ashamed to report to any health facility.

She presently work at the J.F.K Memorial Hospital Emergency Department as a Charge Nurse and some of her duties are: Triage every patient that walks into the emergency department and categorize them according to the international standards, supervise nurses at the department, ensure that all orders are picked up on time and medications administered ,draw a daily assignment schedule for Nurses and Nursing assistant in the department, and carry out all routine nursing procedures( establish iv lines, take vital signs, administer iv, im ,and p.o medications)

She helps  the women at Straight from The Heart with her nursing experience, especially in the area of emergency. She is a great help in the area of helping other women(rural and urban) understand some basic medical practices like personal hygiene, nutrition, family life education, contraception, STI’s, AIDS and other deadly diseases.

Professor Pamela Scully

Photo 45 (1)Professor Pamela Scully is professor of Women’s studies and African studies, and chair of the Women’s studies department at Emory. She has her Ph.D. in history from the University of Michigan, and is originally from South Africa. Her research interests focus on comparative women’s and gender history, with an emphasis on slavery and emancipation, and, more recently, on the relevance of history and feminist theory to ensuring women’s rights in post-conflict societies. Her most recent book is Sara Baartman and the Hottentot Venus: a ghost story and a biography, co-authored with Clifton Crais (Princeton, 2009, 2010). She is currently writing a book entitled Humanitarian Interventions and Sexual Violence. She has been fortunate to visit Liberia number of times. Professor Scully works closely with The Institute for Developing Nations, a partnership between Emory University and The Carter Center, which focuses on collaborative research regarding issues of poverty and development.

 

images[2]Regina Fallah-Hausman Educator

Born in a small town of Kenema, Sierra Leone on November 16, 1973, Regina Fallah-Hausman began her journey through life.  Regina is the second and younger daughter of her parents Reginald Buryan Fallah (deceased) and Lucy Berewa.

Reginald, was an accountant, who died suddenly in his sleep in 1983, when she was 10 years old. Her mother who became widowed struggled to raise her two daughters. They lived on their mother’s meagre nurse’s salary. It was from here that Regina learned much of her independence and self-discipline. At 17 years old, Regina left her birth country to seek a future in the United States. Unfortunately, she was abandoned by her sponsors immediately thereafter and she became homeless.

Despite her dire situation, she strived and persevered. She earned a bachelor’s degree in Social Work. Regina, who has always been ambitious, yearned for higher education.  She enrolled in New York University and earned a master degree with honors in Social Work. The need to become a teacher came about when she had her first daughter, whom the physicians claimed presented with subtle signs of Down syndrome.

Soon, she made her decision that she was going to study to become a special education teacher. She earned a master degree in education for grades five through nine (5-9) and later on earned licensure from grades one through six (1-6).

Regina is currently helping her community in Bo, Sierra Leone. She is the founder and CEO of A Place To Grow Educational Center. This is an effort to provide tuition-free education to disadvantaged and poor children whose families cannot afford and are deprived of quality education. In addition, she is a board member of Straight From The Heart (SFTH).  Also, she is a 2015 fellow of the Prestigious Vital Voices Global Partnership Fellowship. The program supports a global network of emerging and established women leaders who provide unusual and sustainable solutions to pressing problems that have impeded women and girls’ progress to participate fully in society and the economy.

Regina is a kind hearted lady with a passion to helping disadvantaged children. It was during her visit to Sierra Leone with her kids in 2012 that she noticed that kids of the same age could not read or recognise the English language alphabet. It saddened her heart to see those children being deprived of quality education. She felt that they could have been her children and she understood most could not go to school because not afford it. So on her return to the States, she and her sister Agnes began to save their lunch monies. Rather than spending ten dollars ($10.00) daily, and fifty dollars ($50.00 weekly), they each made their lunches from left-over dinners. These monies quickly accumulated and resulted into a substantial amount, which was used to purchase school supplies and materials. They also reached out to family and friends, who willingly supported their cause. In Regina is a kind hearted lady with a passion to helping disadvantaged children. It was during her visit to Sierra Leone with her kids in 2012 that she noticed that kids of the same age could not read or recognise the English language alphabet. It saddened her heart to see those children being deprived of quality education. She felt that they could have been her children and she understood most could not go to school because not afford it. So on her return to the States, she and her sister Agnes began to save their lunch monies. Rather than spending ten dollars ($10.00) daily, and fifty dollars ($50.00 weekly), they each made their lunches from left-over dinners. These monies quickly accumulated and resulted into a substantial amount, which was used to purchase school supplies and materials. They also reached out to family and friends, who willingly supported their cause. In Regina is a kind hearted lady with a passion to helping disadvantaged children. It was during her visit to Sierra Leone with her kids in 2012 that she noticed that kids of the same age could not read or recognise the English language alphabet. It saddened her heart to see those children being deprived of quality education. She felt that they could have been her children and she understood most could not go to school because not afford it. So on her return to the States, she and her sister Agnes began to save their lunch monies. Rather than spending ten dollars ($10.00) daily, and fifty dollars ($50.00 weekly), they each made their lunches from left-over dinners. These monies quickly accumulated and resulted into a substantial amount, which was used to purchase school supplies and materials. They also reached out to family and friends, who willingly supported their cause. In Regina is a kind hearted lady with a passion to helping disadvantaged children. It was during her visit to Sierra Leone with her kids in 2012 that she noticed that kids of the same age could not read or recognise the English language alphabet. It saddened her heart to see those children being deprived of quality education. She felt that they could have been her children and she understood most could not go to school because not afford it. So on her return to the States, she and her sister Agnes began to save their lunch monies. Rather than spending ten dollars ($10.00) daily, and fifty dollars ($50.00 weekly), they each made their lunches from left-over dinners. These monies quickly accumulated and resulted into a substantial amount, which was used to purchase school supplies and materials. They also reached out to family and friends, who willingly supported their cause. In Years after she graduated, when she is asked why she felt so akin to this kind of work.  She always responded “I know that I have patience and it gives me so much pleasure to see the light in the eyes of my kids when they feel confident that ‘they got it’. I truly enjoy doing this work and knowing that I am making a tremendous impact in the lives of these children, it makes my heart sRegina is a kind hearted lady with a passion to helping disadvantaged children. It was during her visit to Sierra Leone with her kids in 2012 that she noticed that kids of the same age could not read or recognise the English language alphabet. It saddened her heart to see those children being deprived of quality education. She felt that they could have been her children and she understood most could not go to school because not afford it. So on her return to the States, she and her sister Agnes began to save their lunch monies. Rather than spending ten dollars ($10.00) daily, and fifty dollars ($50.00 weekly), they each made their lunches from left-over dinners. These monies quickly accumulated and resulted into a substantial amount, which was used to purchase school supplies and materials. They also reached out to family and friends, who willingly supported their cause. In ing and I realize how beneficial my work is.”

 

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